Homeschool, Uncategorized

Why I chose homeschool (Part 2)

First of all, I apologize for the delayed post! Our house got hit with a terrible bout of sickness and it seems to have taken me longer than expected to get into my “groove” again. I find the more I have on my plate, the more I struggle to catch up from little lapses in our schedule and routine. I also promised myself that unless my home, family, and church are being cared for as a priority, I have no business spending time blogging. I now finally feel caught up, healthy and organized and so here I am!

This is a follow up to the previous post on why I am choosing homeschooling. In this post, I would like to focus on the factors of influence and the individual personality of a child.

  1. Influence

Peer pressure. It gets a bad rap really. Everyone always talks about the negative sides of peer pressure when in fact, peer pressure can actually pressure people into becoming better individuals. When taking peer pressure into account, it is not one of the weightiest reasons for me choosing homeschool, however it certainly is a considering factor. Peer pressure is all around us and try as we might, we can never fully protect our children from its grasps. In the previous post, I expressed my concerns against our government run schools and their policies/ideologies. I am far more concerned about teacher/system pressure on my child than I am about peer pressure. I maintain that you could shelter your child from school and then off you go to church where they are confronted with even worse “peers” than at school (gasp! I know…hard to believe right? But remember, if we are doing our job of fulfilling the great commission in our churches as we are supposed to, our churches will be filled with broken people and families with (gasp again!)…sin. Not that they are to stay that way and remain in sin mind you, but at the end of the day, we are all simply works in progress 🙂 ). So if bad influences abound no matter where you turn, it can only be concluded that you must believe and search out the good influences. This is where its important for me that I make sure that my boys are not simply being sheltered from bad influences (next to impossible), but that I am actively searching out good influences for them. The choice of homeschooling for me is a flexible choice. At the present moment, its what makes the most sense and works with our family, however, I am open to God directing us otherwise and I am also hopeful to start a homeschool co-op program (homeschooling with other local families who are interested). The reality is that although I can’t control my children nor hover over them 24/7, I like the involvement that homeschooling and/or co-op homeschooling allows for me in being an influencer upon my child and also having a little more say not in who their peers are, but how much influence they wield. 

2.  Individual personality of a child

We all know that each child is unique and special in their own way. Our elder son Miles is very stubborn, independent, but he also is very easily influenced. He tends to pick up traits, phrases, expressions, etc. from other children very easily. He likes to learn at his own pace, does not prefer typical “classroom” environments nor typical classroom group activities. He likes to engage in single projects that are important to him and act independently in gathering information. That’s the good stuff…now for the bad stuff (we all have our up sides and down sides at the end of the day)…Miles tends to be a bit lazy, complacent and lacking in curiosity. Now knowing this as his parent, I love that I can tailor make and adapt a schooling routine, curriculum and philosophy to not only capitalize on his strengths, but teach him to overcome his weaknesses. In our first two months of homeschooling, I have already learned many things about what works when teaching Miles and what doesn’t. I find that many schools today don’t allow for individual learning styles, not to mention the fact that these days, schools are not the best growing environment for boys in particular (Interested in this subject? I have included some good links for reading about this subject below)

With these things in mind, I have weighed the pros and cons, prayed, sought wisdom and come to the conclusion that in order to protect my boys from the influences of government run programs run by a very corrupt government…in order to ensure that my husband and I maintain a strong influence in our boys’ lives….in order to instruct and inspire them in a way that actually teaches them to love to learn, think, and problem solve…in order to protect, encourage, and foster their masculinity…homeschool is our best option.

As I mentioned before, I really did wrestle with this decision, as I (being a lover of all things “school”) loved the idea of sending my children to a school. As I considered and pondered, I read the following quote by Dale Partridge that really helped me define and clarify my thoughts in this decision making process. I’ll close with it…I hope you enjoyed this post…feel free to share thoughts in the comments below!

“Over the years I’ve heard Christian parents enrolling their young children in public school because “They will be a light to their friends” or “We must teach them to be in the world, but not of the world” or “We can’t keep them in a bubble forever”. My response to these folks is this: All of your extrapolated scriptural references to (“be a light” or “be the salt” or “be in the world not of the world…”) were instructions originally written to adults. Jesus nor any of the apostles sent young children out to evangelize or to disciple or to be missionaries or to be the iron in another child’s life. Now, I understand public school may be the only option for some families. However, let me remind you what Jesus said about the leadership of children, “But whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in Me to stumble, it would be better for him to have a millstone wrapped around his neck and be drowned in the sea.” Public elementary school is not a mission field for your young child. There is an appropriate time and place to reveal this world’s agenda to our children, but it’s not through public schools with transgender philosophies, prayer-free campuses, false scientific teachings, and politically driven ideologies designed to indoctrinate the minds of our 7 year old sons and daughters. And look…there’s nothing easy about finding a safe solution for your child’s education. But one thing that I’ve learned to be true is this: The right thing is almost always the hardest thing.”  –Dale Partridge

 

Read: The War Against Boys (Article by The Atlantic)

Buy: The War Against Boys by Christina Hoff Sommers

Homeschool, Uncategorized

Why I chose homeschool (Part 1)

First things first. Homeschool was not my first choice. I am 100% a lover of all things “school”! For one, I personally enjoyed school immensely. I absolutely loved my college experience and would have loved to continue on in my education were it not for the fact that I felt led to a different path. I always tell others that if I had the money, I would probably just be in school full time. I love learning, I love books, I love notebooks, I love class…I love it all. I also love teaching. I taught in a Christian private school for a few years and thoroughly enjoyed it. I love the idea of sending my boys off to a school with classes, friends, field trips, recess, sports teams, assemblies, and all that comes with the typical school experience. So why, you may ask, the sudden change of heart? For me, it comes down to the issues of curriculum, influence, and the individual personality of a child. This blog post will deal with the issue of curriculum.

My husband was actually the first one to bring up the topic of homeschooling years ago when my oldest son, Miles, was just a baby. At the time, I was totally more on the side of “Nope”! For one, it is a huge investment of your own personal time, and as much as I love my boys, I really and truly love the idea of having some alone time in the day to pursue my business, follow up on new people in the church, clean, etc. No mommy guilt about that sentiment at all, and I think most other moms can relate. When your children are old enough to attend school, it is a time for you to be able to reset, breathe, focus on other endeavours, catch up on work…all this and more.

With that in mind, I love the idea of sending the boys to a good Christian school but in honesty, our finances currently prevent it. With a good Christian school, you can more easily guarantee that you will agree with the curriculum and have more say in what is being taught and sometimes more importantly, not taught. That brings me to the first issue of curriculum. The current situation where we live in the province of Ontario (Canada) is that our liberal run provincial government thinks that children in our schools need an “updated and upgraded” sexual education curriculum. Topics such as masturbation, anal sex, and transgenderism are to be taught to children under the age of ten. There has been some backlash of course, but the prevailing government seems intent on “educating” young children on things that they have no business learning about. In all honesty, I have no problem with my children learning the science behind our bodies and how they work, even perhaps in a sexual sense (at a much older age of course and in gender divided groups). I don’t however want the government, schools and teachers educating my children on their idea of the morality behind this subject. That is strictly for me and my husband, as parents, to teach our boys about. Then of course, to add insult to injury, our provincial government decided to pass the controversial Bill 89 in June of 2017. I have inserted a link at the end of this post for anyone interested to watch on exactly what this already passed bill is all about. The gist of it however can be seen in this outline I have copied from the Real Women of Canada site seen in the following paragraphs.

It (Bill 89) appears to effectively give wide jurisdiction to the State to control the lives of children in the CAS, and in doing so, interfere with the parent/child relationship. This occurs by defining the “best interests of the child” so broadly as to include: the child’s physical, emotional, mental and developmental needs, as well as the child’s race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, family diversity, disability, creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression.

That is, these broad sweeping provisions in the legislation make every family vulnerable to the removal of their children from their home on the basis of the ambiguous provisions listed in the bill as defined by the government, especially by regulations, which require no public debate or approval by the legislature.

For example, this proposed legislation permits the CAS to withdraw a child from its family if it is determined the child is likely to suffer emotional or mental harm, or for a parent’s failure to provide the child with services or treatment. If a child decides he/she is of a gender other than his/her biological gender, the parents are required by this legislation to provide transgender medical services to the child or risk the child being removed from the home.

The reality, too, is that many children do resist parental direction as a part of the growing up process. As a result they may experience “mental and emotional” discomfort when their parents insist that they do as instructed.  This parent/child conflict could, under provisions of the bill, lead to the removal of the child from the home.

Unlike the previous Act, a child’s religion is no longer a factor to be considered in determining the child’s best interest. That is, “religious faith” has been removed at nearly every reference contained in the previous Act.  No longer can parents direct their child’s religion, but rather it is the “child’s creed” that is to be taken into consideration when determining the needs of a child.   This provision will create conflict within the family over such issues as abortion, gender identity or even assisted suicide if the child decides that is what he/she wishes.  The inclusion of children in the assisted suicide legislation is currently being heavily advocated. (realwomenofcanada.ca/bill-28)

With these kinds of curriculums and bills in place, there is a very real and definitive attack against the family, against religion, and against the innocence of our children. I would be lying if I didn’t say that this issue singularly was the biggest deciding factor in whether I would send my boys to school or not. I simply do not feel comfortable releasing my children to a government run program that is so firmly anti-religion and anti-biblical truth. Don’t be deceived if you haven’t seen it firsthand yet in your community schools. Satan is not a fool and he never plays fair. He almost always works slowly and incrementally so that his agenda does not shock or cause immediate alarm. However over time, it creeps in while those who are not watching are oblivious to its subtle deceptions and this is what I believe is his strategy for our schools. Pray for our schools, families and especially our children here in Ontario. Not every family has the privilege or opportunity to homeschool or send their children to private schools and so we need to do everything we can to support those families who are most vulnerable. Raise awareness. Speak out.  But most importantly, let’s pray,

Link to video on Bill 89

Stay tuned for another blog post on the next two issues on why I decided to homeschool (influence and individual personality of a child).

 

Xo Kristin